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EMERALD-The Fourth Stone

 

Red Emerald-Bixbite

 

Beryl has been considered a valuable gemstone since prehistoric times. There are many colors of beryl known under many names. Green beryl is called emerald. In the 1800s green beryl was removed from the beryl family and called emerald. Blue beryl is aquamarine, colorless is goshenite, pink is morganite and yellow is heliodor ranging from a bright yellow to a honey-golden yellow.

Red beryl is extremely rare and mimics shades of red from bubble gum to to scarlet, or the color of blood. Mainly found within the Wah Wah Mountains of Utah, only an estimated 60 pounds were ever mined in the history of the world! Some smaller amounts have been found in other countries recently. Oddly enough it seems people are drawn to this stone yet do not understand why. The reason will be revealed later via an exerpt from The Stones Journal.

Blood?

 

The most common thread between this stone, its rarity, and the similar color of blood is in fact that the bible pounds a message to its readers that we should never forget that Jesus shed his blood for our sins. What better way to elevate the significance of that sacrifice than to mark it with the rarest gemstone in the world? These facts seem confusing but within The Revelation Painting there is a mystery of Revelation which has been overlooked since the bible was written and it will be revealed in The Stones Journal. Once revealed, the mystery is easily seen in the painting. The price for red beryl or Bixbite is astronomical! For one faceted carat, you can expect to pay $20,000.00 or more. Although I have obtained 6 carats of rough stone and the collection required for this section of the painting (an estimated 272 carats) will obviously have to be forfieted in lieu of a replacement stone of similar color or some other meaningful way to express the significance of this most important section.

I once spoke to a man who had worked in the mines in Utah and asked for the owner’s contact information. He was very put off when he found that I needed to crush it for the painting. He went on to say that the stone was highly coveted and that the owner would never sacrifice it for the painting. I will never know if I do not ask, so time will tell if the mine owner will sacrifice a handful of the stone.

(THIS SECTION WILL BE UPDATED as developments occur)

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